Rebellion 1850     
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Congressional Scales, a true balance
Congressional Scales, a true balance. Lithograph, 1850. The cartoon satirized President Zachary Taylor's attempts to balance Southern and Northern interests on the question of slavery in 1850. According to the Library of Congress commentary:

Taylor stands atop a pair of scales, with a weight in each hand; the weight on the left reads "Wilmot Proviso" and the one on the right "Southern Rights." Below, the scales are evenly balanced, with several members of Congress, including Henry Clay in the tray on the left, and others, among them Lewis Cass and John Calhoun, on the right. Taylor says, "Who said I would not make a "NO PARTY" President? I defy you to show any party action here." One legislator on the left sings, "How much do you weigh? Eight dollars a day. Whack fol de rol!" Another states, "My patience is as inexhaustible as the public treasury." A congressman on the right says, "We can wait as long as they can." On the ground, at right, John Bull observes, "That's like what we calls in old Hingland, a glass of 'alf and 'alf."

Published by N. Currier. Library of Congress.