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Rebellion March to April 1837     
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Seminoles on Exhibition, 1936
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Seminole Indians on exhibition. 1936 by G.W. Lamoreaux. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, LC-USZ62-112859.
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Relations with the Army were cordial, even friendly. A soldier returned a stolen pony that belonged to Abraham's son. Osceola came in peacefully to Fort Mellon, where he rekindled friendships with officers he had known before the war. The chief even shared a tent with Lt. Harney, the company commander. For the benefit of the soldiers, Osceola staged a traditional ball game. 

Relieved American officers thought that the end was in sight.

"The War, I hope is over; at all events there is but little danger of a renewal of hostilities, if the Troops be held in readiness for immediate action, and the inhabitants of Florida act with ordinary prudence." -- Jesup to Secretary of War Joel Poinsett, March 9, 1837

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Sources: Kieffer 166-168, Childs 3: 282, Williams 27, Wickman xxiv, Francke 24, ASPMA 7: 835, 867, 871.
Part 2, War: Outline  l  Images
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 Trail Narrative
 + Prologue
 + Background: 1693-1812
 + Early Years: 1812-1832
 - War: 1832-1838
+ Prelude to War
+ Revenge
+ Deceit
spacer spacer General Jesup
Jesup's Tactics
Hostages
The Diplomat
Peace
Slaveholders
Betrayal
Escape
Rage
White Flags
+ Liberty or Death
 + Exile: 1838-1850
 + Freedom: 1850-1882
 + Legacy & Conclusion

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Major Childs describes the return of a pony to Abraham's son