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Rebellion September 1837     
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Osceola, Coacoochee, and John Horse
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Osceola, Coacoochee, and John Horse, by Catlin (1838) and N. Orr (1848). Sources: Smithsonian American Art Museum (for Osceola) and Sprague's The Origin, Progress, and Conclusion of the Florida War.
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Like Osceola, Coacoochee was a great friend to the Black Seminoles, and he was destined to have a long association with John Horse. In September of 1837, the terms of that association were about to take shape in a rapid series of notorious events. 

With his father held hostage, Coacoochee agreed to meet Jesup for a parley. When he came in for the talk, Jesup -- in total disregard of the rules of war -- seized Coacoochee as his prisoner. The deceitful action went largely unnoticed, but it set the stage for one of the more infamous acts of treachery in the history of early America.

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Sources: ASPMA 7: 848, Mahon 214.
Part 2, War: Outline  l  Images
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 Trail Narrative
 + Prologue
 + Background: 1693-1812
 + Early Years: 1812-1832
 - War: 1832-1838
+ Prelude to War
+ Revenge
+ Deceit
spacer spacer General Jesup
Jesup's Tactics
Hostages
The Diplomat
Peace
Slaveholders
Betrayal
Escape
Rage
White Flags
+ Liberty or Death
 + Exile: 1838-1850
 + Freedom: 1850-1882
 + Legacy & Conclusion